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reduce unemployment to nearly five -- two near 5% and three years. it would reduce the deficit by $4.4 trillion over 10 years. and it would strengthen medicare and medicaid amah and you'd be asking the wealthy to pay their fair share. -- medicare and medicaid and you would be asking the wealthy to pay their fair share. guest: the institute of policy analysis estimated that you are spending money on infrastructure. we have a to point to dollar trillion infrastructure deficit, according to the transportation -- american society of civil engineers. building roads, highways, bridges, etc. you put people to work building schools and other necessary things. you give money to the states. the states have laid off 700,000 cops, firefighters, and teachers. you give money to states for couple years to rehire them. those kinds of things add up. by doing all this, you stimulate the economy. that means the private sector generates more jobs. it comes to about 7 million altogether. host: what do you consider fair share when it comes to wealthy taxpayers? guest: we propose two different things. numb
, and the senate thinks shouldsome revenue should be idea to tackle the deficit and invest in the middle class, not just simply cut tax rates for the rich. >> usually you can tax more and spend more and borrow more and that will somehow create growth and prosperity. i believe we have had four years of that experiment, which i fundamentally doubted and opposed from the beginning. and it hasn't worked. >> shepard: regardless of whether it's worked or hasn't, the insiders say the democratic budget will likely pass. mike emanuel is in washington. how has the vote been going and what's it like in there so far? reporter: we expect starting any moment they'll vote on a series of amendments between now and late night tonight. 25 to 40. summon hot-button issues including abortion, school choice, and bailouts. there are also arguments on budgetary matters. >> anyone wants to be taxed more than is necessary on either side of the aisle, but this enormous, enormous hubbub from the other side that says it's got a spending problem but refuses to look at the other side of the balance sheet, as a business guy,
the deficit by meaning don't raise revenue are not serious about cutting the deficit. >> neil: even though we've raised revenue, bottom line. >> we should be willing to close tax loopholes if we didn't have a deficit, if we didn't have debt. it's the right thing to do. >> neil: we raised taxes. >> i didn't say raise taxes, i said close loopholes. republicans call closing loopholes raising taxes because it's the rich that have unfair practice. >> neil: have you filled out your brackets? yes or no. have you filled out your brackets? >> no, i haven't done that. i'm going to leave that to the president. he may be late on that too. >> neil: i'm sorry. thank you very much. >> thank you, neil. >> neil: do you remember this? an interview i said senator paul and senator cruz were whacko birds. that's inappropriate and i apologize to them for saying that. >> neil: after that, senator cruz accepted that apology. is senator rand paul about to do the same? and as nevada mourns the death of seven marines, did their senator blame the sequester? meet the military commander telling harry to say i'm sorry. [ m
about deficit reduction that it is a misplaced focus, that the real priority should be on job creation. but it seems that too many people in congress who just think the most important thing is to cut cut cut. so is the deficit really the most thant thing? is the deficit out of control, or is job korea payings more important? >> chris van hollen is right. we have over 40 million american families living in poverty. these numbers carry with them a really human toll. so if we want to be looking at the long-term success of the u.s. economy, then balancing the budget in the short term is a really short-term mistake. >> bill: in other words the best thing we could do to grow the economy is put people back to work. >> yes, and make the sorts of investments that will get people to work today, take a look at pre-k. you are not only employing a lot more full-time teachers but at the same time you are investing in future workers. >> bill: how can it be that you have got -- again, the dough -- these new record highs, corporate profits record high financial institutions are back
. it is balanced in terms of making sure we move to responsibly managing our debt and deficit, getting our deficit down to less than 3% of the gdp, as every economist in the bowls simps simpson, all the gang of six have focused us on doing, but also make sure we make that investments to keep our middle class strong. >> the point of our budget is to make sure that we show that we have a ten-year plan, if we can put it into place, we will get our economy moving again, we will begin to manage our debt, and we will quit doing this management by crisis where every time we turn around, the republicans say they'll shut the government down if we don't cut more. we need to have a responsible plan. that is what i'm putting forward. it's what the democrats are supporting today, and i'm very proud of it. i think this shows the american people with can manage our country wisely. >>> before you go to the floor, i wanted to quickly ask about the assault weapon ban. harry reid has decided not to put it in the gun legislation. dianne feinstein is angry, deeply disappointed, still wants a shot at it. what do you th
the budget because the president and treasury secretary were worried about the long term deficit? does that sound familiar? at the exact same time, the fed tightened rates, doing what all the bears say bernanke should do, betting that inflation could rage and rage easily if the fed stayed easy, which is what his critics are saying he should do right now. but when we went down this road in 1937 it sent the economy into an amazing tail spin. causing a recession within a depression. it was an economic calamity that was totally avoidable if the people in power made different, smarter choices. especially the federal reserve. ben bernanke does not want history to repeat itself. he's not going down the path of what the fed did in 1937. he's not stupid. even though that's exactly the path unfortunately that the president and congress are taking. bernanke recognizes that obama and congress have repeated the errors of 1937 down to a tee. he can't let the fed's part in the drama be repeated. otherwise he'd go down as the fed chief who never got the economy going and put it back in a recession, a
you need to deal with it budgets and deficits and you need to keep growth going. here is what i saw over the weekend. recession in greece which is a actually a depression if you line it up against the u.s. great depression in 1929 it looks a lot a like in terms of how much unemployment there send a how much the economy was contracted. greece is having our great depression of the late 1920s. >> wow. >>> moving on to washington now. president obama's renewed push for a grand bargain may be showing some early signs of paying off, at least with one top republican. senator bob corker of tennessee says he could envision raising tax revenue if democrats embrace big changes to medicare and social security. he is at odds with other members of his party including house speaker john boehner who is ruling out the prospect of any new taxes. >> i think, by the way, there is a chance on a deal. i know the president is saying the right things and we have an opportunity over the next four to five months. i think republicans, if they saw true entitlement reform would be glad to look at tax reform tha
, but ultimately if there's any chance at dealing with the debt and deficit, these two, very different philosophies and visions. >> early april, the president comes up with his budget recommendation. a lot of people are hoping all of this will eventually result in the grand bargain, a real deal looking down the road, everyone on board basically. a deal that would avoid, for example, having to worry about raising the debt ceiling end of july, early august. is that at all doable? >> it is possible. i wouldn't go as far as saying doable now. but what i will say, the difference in approach now versus say two years ago when they tried this and it failed and it was, you know, almost the end of the world as the u.s. bumped up against the debt ceiling, the difference is they are going through what we call in washington regular order. everything is done in the open. i think that has lead to a different atmosphere on capitol hill where people know what's going on, they're voting on measures, and they're not waiting to see the white smoke from the white house when the president and house speaker and others ar
do both. make sure we have deficit reduction but don't cut too much too fast. >> dick durbin also optimistic they can move forward. as congress grapples with developing a budget it must deal with another problem that looms it has to pass a continued resolution before march 27th to avert a government shut down. heather, they go on break at the end of this week. we will see what happens. >> of course they do. they are always going on breakdown there. >>> it is time for your first degree weather update with ma r maria molina. >> maria is in the weather center tracking another storm. is that right? >> yes. a brand new storm impacting portions of the upper midwest today and we are expecting to see snow from the same system into the northeast as we height. we could be seeing significant accumulations especially across places in new england. want to start out with high temperatures. we are seeing wild disparities as far as the temperatures go. take a look at minneapolis. 30 degrees for the high temperature today. it will feel more like january than march. in san antonio you could see rec
that passed through the senate really echos what president obama would like to see in terms of deficit reduction but the problem, of course, is when you match up is the senate bill with the house bill. the senate bill calls for deficit reduction through increasing taxes and spending cuts and, of course, the house bill calls for steep cuts in balancing the budget within ten years. of course, some revisions to medicare as well. a lot of differences and we have another deadline coming up. the debt ceiling will have to be revisited this summer, alex. >> looking forward to that. >> reporter: yeah, we all are. >> thank you very much, kristen welker. >>> joining me right now, andy sullivan and ann palmer. ann, i'll begin with you. the president is back from the middle east. the reviews are out there. how are you getting the word in terms of how he was perceived? >> i think one of the key things you can look at is what the israeli press put out in the days following his first steps and throughout the entire visit and it was a resounding applause. he got very good praise from them. obviously fr
the deficit, more stimulus and spending. we are in the funny process where we will wrap up 50 hours of debate and then start the unlimited amendment process. any issue you have heard your callers call in and complain --ut, we might see today drone strikes against u.s. citizens, taxes, repealing healthcare -- they might all come up, but it is adding to a nonbinding budget resolution, so it is interesting and it might give people clues. host: a headline in your sayscation, "the hill," the senate is poised to pass a budget. guest: i think democrats will control the process and get it passed. .hey have a small window they can afford five democrats to not vote for it and still pass it, and in that case you would need vice president joe biden to break the time. -- the thai. .- tie there is pent-up frustration on the republican side about no real budget debate over four years. once it is passed, a lot of people will feel better. democrats will say we passed a budget, republicans get to complain about the budget month but from there it is hard to see how the senate budget reconciles with the house bu
the deficit long term. the democrat budget, of course, talks about a big tax hike over ten years of about $1 trillion. republicans say they're not going to do that. they want to roll back obama care. these are the two outside extreme positions. that's where we're at now. going forward can they come together and find some middle ground? >> weigh in on that, lauren. is there really a chance for reconciling these two extreme budgets? >> i think david kind of nailed it here. when it comes to the budgets, they're just a little bit too far, but this budget process isn't a waste of time. i think it's promising that they went through regular order. this is something that the senate hasn't done. they haven't passed a budget this a long time. i think what we'll see is this may open the door to pass some appropriations bilts for 2014 and this could put us on the road for a long-term deficit reduction deal. these are just opening gothss here. >> david, as i look at your article, it focuses on immigration reform and how it's making its way through the senate. where do things stand right now? >> alex, the
, italy because they're all suffering and because of too much spending, too much debt, deficit is too high. all right, senator, congratulations on your big win. i know when you announce if you're running for president you'll do it hear? you want to make that promise? >> oh, yeah, we didn't already announce it. >> sean: no, i'm just checking. thank you, senator. >> all right. >> sean: appreciate it. and coming up on "hannity." >> i studied the constitution myself. i'm roonebly well-educated and i thank you for the lecture. >> i would note that she chose not to answer the question that i asked. >> the answer is obvious no. >> sean: well, she did need the lecture, left wing senator dianne feinstein says she felt, quote, patronized by that exchange simply because she was asked about the assault weapons ban. and ted cruz will join me to respond and later dr. benjamin carson brought down the house over at cpac and hinting that he may run for the white house. i'll ask him about that and much more. this is a jam-packed edition of "hannity." much more straight ahead. ♪ [ slap! ] [ male announcer
deficit reduction who say this budget won't do it. >> okay, congressman. as you know, house democrats are also out with their budget. joining senate democrats in calling for more revenue as well as spending to create jobs. but paul ryan didn't seem too optimistic about this this morning. take a listen to what he said. >> all the democratic budgets have one theme. more taxes, higher spending, never balancing the budget. if you look at these two budgets, yeah, we're two worlds apart. we're literally on different planets. >> he says you're literally on different planets. do you, therefore, have any hope of a compromise? >> well, not very much with paul ryan. i do believe that as steny hoyer, the himinority whip said he thinks republicans are going to have a difficult time getting votes for this budget. as we remember, the republican presidential candidate in 2012 ran away from the ryan budget which was not nearly as severe as this one is. so he's going to have problems with his own members in the republican conference and on this vote, but, you know, paul ryan is right. we are on very di
deficits and debt. how can you not worry about that. they do seem integrally involved in phobia, a lot of we don't want anybody else coming to this country. >> yeah, yeah, that's -- that's true, chris. it's this idea that they're losing their country. they fear change. they fear -- they're anxious about the change that we see. we see the browning of america. we see, you know, the gay rights movement is preceding at pace. you know, we saw the first female speaker of the house not too long ago. so it's this change that they have a problem dealing with, chris. and let me get to the point about -- >> why would somebody care -- i always wondered about this. why would somebody who is white care about whether the country is white 100 years from now? they're not going to be here. and the people here would be comfortable with it. your nature will change with the country's nature. it does sound like pure racism. if you want the country to be tribally white 100 years from now. i don't know why a black person would care either. why do people speculate the way they think what the country will be li
the deficit. you have to have a process. now every package we get has been 11th-hour, crafted by the leadership behind closed doors. it concentrates the power in the hands of leadership and takes at away from the rank and file. take gets you to a place where i did not get everything i wanted, but i get some of what i want it. everybody does not expect to get 100 percent. you did not expect that you are going to get more hundred% adopted. the same is true in congress. they have to reconcile those differences. the only way to do that is still a legitimate process. it has to be bipartisan. somebody is on to say, bipartisanship is not a theory, it is a political necessity. >> i am going to have to ask if we have time for one more question. we have time. you guys are lucky, at least one of you is. inwill get to a microphone one second. would you please come up here. the sandtist and on -- sanford andl don't that society. one of the major concerns in this country is the affordable health care act, and there is a lot of concern about that. i have to ask senator daschle, snowe, and no
. you think our deficit is bad, they don't print that much money in the fed. we don't have that much in the system. jon: jim gray, good to talk to you. thanks, jim. jenna: breaking news out of washington, d.c. the president is officially announcing his nomination for labor secretary. his name is thomas perez. he is standing next to the president. just a few things he should know about thomas perez. assistant attorney general for the civil rights division right now. he spent a lot of time in his career focusing on consumer rights and protection as well. if he is confirmed, the process that takes place after the official no announcement he will be only latino in the president's cabinet. they need to get americans back to work as labor secretary and what kind of role considering his background mr. perez might play in immigration reform and what type of employment policies could be put in place if there is some overarching immigration reform. we'll keep you posted on the announcement. as we hear more we'll bring that to you. jon: it was ten years ago that operation iraqi freedom launched
trillion deficits -- that would be the annual difference between what we bring in and what the government spends -- four in a row more than a trillion dollars -- after more than $1.6 trillion in tax increases, after hundreds of billions of dollars worth of new regulations, our country is mired, we are mired in the longest period of high unemployment since the great depression. that is a direct consequence of this huge debt and our creditors' lack of confidence that we're actually serious about dealing with it. indeed, many workers have simply given up on finding work, which is one reason why our labor force participation rate is now at a 32-year low. unemployment's almost 8% but that doesn't take into account the millions of people who have simply given up looking for work after a long period of unemployment. since june 2009, when the recession officially ended, median household income has fallen by more than $2,400. so instead of treading water, the average american family is seeing their buying power decrease by more than $ 2,400 since 2009. at the same time, they're finding not only ar
federal deficits in five years makes it imprudent to jump in with both feet. consider on tuesday paul endorsed a version of immigration reform that would allow the 11 million or so undocumented immigrants in this country to become legal. the week before he defied the hawks in his party to lead a 13-hour filibuster in protest of the obama admission's secretory over its drone war fare program. >> dan senor, you've been involved in republican presidential primaries lately. sorry about that. how would those issues stack up in new hampshire and iowa and south carolina and florida? >> i think the politics, his politics on pure fiscal issues will have tremendous resonance as his father experienced in some primary states and caucus states. i think what is untested is -- from a -- from a political standpoint is his position on foreign policy. his father never really broke through on the neoisolationist politics at the grassroots level beyond a narrow segment of the electorate. rand who i've spent time talking about these issues is much salvier than his father. >> his father blamed in effect u.
-income americans to reduce the deficit. so now, finally, senate democrats feel that they can go ahead and echo that position. that's change. >> an narc the president is expected to release the white house budget in april. what kind of compromises, if any, can we expect to see there? >> i think he is going to kind of come up and say the same things that he has been saying. we will look at the changes he will make to the entitlement program. the republicans saying they will not raise tax and what the democrats might do on entitlement reforms if they can find any kind of common ground that would be possible there. >> bill schneider, anna palmer, stick around. we would like to come back to you later in the hour, if that's okay with you. >> sure. >> thanks. >>> could bill clinton be talking out of both sides of his mouth? the report that suggests escorting two candidates for the same office. we will talk about that. >>> first though, kristen cinema is here, very excited about being here. we just had a 15-minute conversation to make up. we can't talk about that. we can talk immigration, marriage equ
-point deficit to beat the cleveland cavaliers 98-95. they have now won 24 games in a row. >> bill: can you imagine being down 27. >> i mean that's -- in the third quarter being down that much is daunting. but it shows just how dominant lebron james is, when he is ready to turn it on, he turns it on, and there is no stopping him. which is different than he used to be. now he is a monster. >> bill: you have got it. we have a great lineup for you for the rest of the program, congress woman judy chu from southern california will be joining us as well as a friend of bill from the "huffington post" and joe, our own foreign policy guru who will bring us up to date on what the president is up to in the middle east and his syria in fact use chemical weapons as has been reported. and the republican party engaged in a sort of a civil war. we'll get into that, but first -- >> announcer: this is the "full court press." >> espn releasing president obama's complete march madness yesterday as the men's tournament gets underway today. number one louisville, indiana, ohio state, an
spending but leaves the government with $566 billion in annual deficits over the next ten years. the house plan balances the budget by 2023 with big cuts in domestic spending and major changes to medicare and the tax code. charlie rangel, new york's most famous congressman, is here with me. former chair of the house ways and means committee. start with the chasm between the two plans. is there room for compromise at all between the senate and house plan? >> the major difference is that, obama and most of the country that voted for him really thinks that a time of recession that we're coming out of it that we should be creating jobs and not laying off people just with cuts. that is the difference. the major difference between the senate and the house. republicans say no taxes, no money, no investment. well, that's absolutely ridiculous. in order to get people back to work and having disposable income, you've got to invest in education, the infrastructure, the bridges and the tunnels. there's no money in the republican, because they say that we're taking care of revenues. where the heck that
. hagan: thank you, mr. president. this amendment establishes a deficit -- the presiding officer: the senate will be in order. mrs. hagan: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from north carolina. mrs. hagan: this amendment establishes a deficit-neutral reserve fund for families of service members and veterans. my home state has the third largest military footprint in the nation. one out of every three people is in the military, a veteran or related to a service member or veteran, and we are proud that we make military families welcome in north carolina because supporting military families is one of the best ways that we can support our troops. this amendment is deficit neutral. it will not add one penny to our deficit. it helps to create room in the budget for legislation to help military families in areas ranging from health care to housing and from education to job placement while their loved ones are serving our country away from home. a vote for this amendment is a vote for our military families, for the sons, daughters, husbands, wives and families who sacrific
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)

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